Frazier. Folklore in the Old Testament, Part 1

Today's free book is Folklore in the Old Testament: Studies in Comparative Religion, Legend, and Law by James George Frazier. The book is in 4 parts, divided in 3 volumes. Below is the index for Part I, "The Early Ages of the World," which is included in Volume I.

For the table of contents, check at the bottom of this post below the image.

Frazer Folklore in the Old Testament, Volume 1:
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PART I: THE EARLY AGES OF THE WORLD

CHAPTER I: THE CREATION OF MAN
Two different accounts of the creation of man in Genesis
The Priestly and the Jehovistic narratives
The Jehovistic the more primitive
Babylonian and Egyptian parallels
Greek legend of the creation of man out of clay
Australian and Maori stories of the creation of man out of clay
Tahitian tradition: creation of woman out of man's rib
Similar stories of the creation of woman in Polynesia
Similar Karen and Tartar stories
Other stories of the creation of man in the Pacific
Melanesian legends of the creation of men out of clay
Stories of the creation of man in Celebes
Stories told by the Dyaks of Borneo
Legend told by the natives of Nias
Stories told by the natives of the Philippines
Indian legends of the creation of man
Cheremiss story of the creation of man
African stories of the creation of man
American stories of the creation of man
Our first parents moulded out of red clay
Belief of savages in the evolution of man out of lower animals
American Indian stories of the evolution of men out of animals
African and Malagasy stories of the evolution of men
Evolution of men out of fish in Africa and Borneo
Descent of men from trees and animals in the Indian Archipelago
Descent of men from animals in New Guinea
Descent of men from fish and grubs in the Pacific
Evolution of men out of animals in Australia
Evolutionary hypothesis of Empedocles
Creation or evolution?

CHAPTER 2: THE FALL OF MAN

§ 1 The Narrative in Genesis
The temptation and the fall, the woman and the serpent
The two trees
The Tree of Life and the Tree of Death
The Creator's good intention frustrated by the serpent
The serpent's selfish motive for deceiving the woman
Widespread belief in the immortality of serpents
Story of the Fall, a story of the origin of death

§ 2 The Story of the Perverted Message
Hottentot story of the Moon and the hare
Bushman story of the Moon and the hare
Nandi story of the Moon and the dog
Hottentot story of the Moon, the insect, and the hare
Bushman story of the Moon, the tortoise, and the hare
Louyi story of the Sun and Moon, the chameleon and the hare
Ekoi story of God, the frog, and the duck
Gold Coast story of God, the sheep, and the goat
Ashantee story of God, the sheep, and the goat
Akamba story of God, the chameleon, and the thrush
Togoland story of God, the dog, and the frog
Calabar story of God, the dog, and the sheep
Bantu story of God, the chameleon, and the lizard
The miscarriage of the message of immortality

§ 3 The Story of the Cast Skin
Supposed immortality of animals that cast their skins
How men missed immortality and serpents, etc. obtained it
Belief that men formerly cast their skins and lived forever
Belief that men used to rise from the dead after three days
How men missed immortality and the Moon obtained it
Bahnar story how men used to rise from the dead
Rivalry between men and serpents, etc. for immortality

§ 4 The Composite Story of the Perverted Message and the Cast Skin
Galla story of God, the blue bird, and the serpent
Stories of the Good Spirit, men, and serpents

§ 5 Conclusion
Original form of the story of the Fall of Man

CHAPTER III: THE MARK OF CAIN
The theory that the mark was a tribal badge
Homicides shunned as infected
Attic law concerning homicides
Seclusion of murderers in Dobu
Belief in the infectiousness of homicides in Africa
Earth supposed to spurn the homicide
Wanderings of the matricide Alcmaeon
Earth offended by bloodshed and appeased by sacrifice
The homicide's mark perhaps a danger-signal to others
The mark perhaps a protection against the victim's ghost
Ceremonies to appease the ghosts of the slain
Seclusion of murderer through fear of his victim's ghost
Fear of ghosts of the murdered, a motive for executing murderers
Protection of executioners against the ghosts of their victims
Bodily marks to protect people against ghosts of the slain
Need of guarding warriors against the ghosts of the slain
Various modes of guarding warriors against the ghosts of the slain
Faces or bodies of manslayers painted in diverse colours
The mark of Cain perhaps a disguise against the ghost of Abel
Advantage of thus interpreting the mark
The blood rather than the ghost of Abel prominent in the narrative
Fear of leaving blood of man or beast uncovered
Superstition a crutch of morality

CHAPTER IV: THE GREAT FLOOD

§ 1 Introduction
Huxley on the Great Flood
The present essay a study in folk-lore
Bearing of flood stories on problems of origin and diffusion

§ 2 The Babylonian Story of a Great Flood
Babylonian tradition recorded by Berosus
Nicolaus of Damascus on the flood
Modern discovery of the original Babylonian story
The Gilgamesh epic
Journey of Gilgamesh to Ut-napishtim
Ut-napishtim's story of the Great Flood
The building of the ship—the embarkation—the storm
The sending forth of the dove and the raven—the landing
Other fragmentary versions of the Babylonian story
Sumerian version of the flood story
The flood story borrowed by the Semites from the Sumerians
The scene of the story laid at Shurippak on the Euphrates

§ 3 The Hebrew Story of a Great Flood
The story in Genesis
The story compounded of two different narratives
The Priestly Document and the Jehovistic Document
Late date and ecclesiastical character of the Priestly Document
Its contrast with the Jehovistic Document
Verbal differences between the Priestly and the Jehovistic Documents
Material differences between the documents in the flood story
The Jehovistic document the older of the two
Dependence of the Hebrew on the Babylonian story of the flood
Fanciful additions made to the flood story in later times

§ Ancient Greek Stories of a Great Flood
Deucalion and Pyrrha
The grounding of the ark on Parnassus
Aristotle and Plato on Deucalion's flood
Ovid's rhetorical account of the flood
Athenian legend of Deucalion's flood
The grave of Deucalion and the Water-bearing Festival at Athens
Story of Deucalion's flood at Hierapolis on the Euphrates
Water festival and prayers at Hierapolis
Deucalion, the ark, and the dove
Phrygian story of a flood associated with King Nannacus
Noah's flood on coins of Apanea Cibotos in Phrygia
Greek traditions of three great floods
The flood of Ogyges
Dates assigned by ancient authorities to the flood of Ogyges
The flood of Ogyges and the vicissitudes of the Copaic Lake
The ruins of Gla on a stranded island of the lake
The flood of Dardanus. Home of Dardanus at Pheneus
Alternations of the valley of Pheneus between wet and dry
The watermark on the mountains of Pheneus
Samothracian story of great flood consequent on opening of Dardanelles
The Samothracian story partially confirmed by geology
The Samothracian story probably a speculation of an early philosopher
Story of Deucalion's flood perhaps an inference from the configuration of Thessaly
The Vale of Tempe
The Greek flood stories probably myths of observation

§ 5 Other European Stories of a Great Flood
Icelandic story of a deluge of blood
Welsh story of a flood
Lithuanian story of a great flood
Flood story told by the gipsies of Transylvania
Vogul story of a great flood
Relics of the flood in Savoy

§ 6 Supposed Persian Stories of a Great Flood
Supposed traces of a flood story in ancient Persian literature
The sage Yima and his blissful enclosure

§ 7 Ancient Indian Stories of a Great Flood
The story in the Satapatha Brahmana. Manu and the fish
The story in the Mahabharata
The story in the Sanscrit Puranas

§ 8 Modern Indian Stories of a Great Flood
Stories told by the Bhils and Kamars of Central India
Stories told by the Hos and Mundas of Bengal
Stories told by the Santals of Bengal
Stories told by the Lepchas of Sikhim and tribes of Assam
Shan story of a great flood
Tradition concerning the Vale of Cashmeer
Geological confirmation of the tradition
The tradition probably a myth of observation

§ 9 Stories of a Great Flood in Eastern Asia
Stories told by the Karens and Singphos of Burma
Story told by the Bahnars or Bannavs of Cochin China
Stories told by the aborigines of the Malay Peninsula
Story told by the Lolos of Southern China
Chinese tradition of a great flood
A Chinese emperor on Noah's flood
Kamchadale story of a great flood
Mongolian story of a great flood

§ 10 Stories of a Great Flood in the Indian Archipelago
Stories told by the Battas of Sumatra
Stories told by the natives of Nias and Engano
Stories told by the Dyaks of Borneo
Stories told by the natives of Celebes
Stories told by the natives of Ceram and Rotti
Story told by the natives of Flores
Stories told by the Philippine Islanders
Stories told by the wild tribes of Formosa
Story told by the Andaman Islanders

§ 11 Stories of a Great Flood in Australia
Story told by the Kurnai of Victoria
Stories told by other tribes of Victoria
Stories told by the aborigines of South Australia and Queensland

§ 12 Stories of a Great Flood in New Guinea and Melanesia
Stories told by the natives of New Guinea
R Neuhauss on stories of a flood in New Guinea
Fijian story of a great flood
Melanesian story of a great flood

§ 13 Stories of a Great Flood in Polynesia and Micronesia
Wide diffusion of such stories in the Pacific
Tahitian legends of a great flood
Hawaiian legends of a great flood
Mangaian story of a great flood
Samoan traditions of a great flood
Maori stories of a great flood
Story of a great flood told by the Pelew Islanders

§ 14 Stories of a Great Flood in South America
Stories told by the Indians near Rio de Janeiro
Story told by the Caingangs of Southern Brazil
Story told by the Carayas of Brazil
Story told by the Ipurina of the Purus River
Story told by other Indians of the Purus River
Story told by the Jibaros of the Upper Amazon
Story told by the Muratos of Ecuador
Story told by the Araucanians of Chili
Story told by the Ackawois of British Guiana
Story told by the Arawaks of British Guiana
Story told by the Macusis of British Guiana
Stories told by the Indians of the Orinoco
Stories told by the Muyscas or Chibchas of Bogota
Geological evidence as to the valley of Bogota
Story told by the Canaris of Ecuador
Stories told by the Peruvian Indians
Story told by the Chiriguanos of Bolivia
Story told by the Fuegians

§ 15 Stories of a Great Flood in Central America and Mexico
Stories told by the Indians of Panama and Nicaragua
Mexican tradition of a great flood
Michoacan legend of a great flood
Story of a great flood in the Popol Vuh
Story told by the Huichol Indians of Mexico
Stories told by the Cora Indians of Mexico
Story told by the Tarahumares of Mexico
Story told by the Caribs of the Antilles

§ 16 Stories of a Great Flood in North America
Story told by the Papagos of Arizona
Stories told by the Pimas
Story told by the Zuni Indians of New Mexico
Stories told by the Californian Indians
Story told by the Natchez of the Lower Mississippi
Story told by the Mandan Indians
Annual Mandan ceremonies commemorative of the flood
Story told by the Cherokee Indians
Story of a Great Flood widely spread among the Algonquins
Story told by the Montagnais Indians of Canada
Story told by the Crees
The Algonquin story told in full by the Chippeways
An Ojibway version of the same story
Another Ojibway version of the same story
Another Ojibway version of the same story
Another version of the same story told by the Blackfoot Indians
Another version of the same story told by the Ottawas
Another version of the same story told by the Crees
Another version of the same story told by the Dogrib and Slave Indians
Another version of the same story told by the Hareskin Indians
Stories of a Great Flood told by the Tinneh Indians
Stories told by the Tlingit Indians of Alaska
Story told by the Haida Indians of Queen Charlotte Islands
Story told by the Tsimshian Indians of British Columbia
Story told by the Bella Coola Indians of British Columbia
Story told by the Kwakiutl Indians of British Columbia
Story told by the Lillooet Indians of British Columbia
Story told by the Thompson Indians of British Columbia
Story told by the Kootenay Indians of British Columbia
Stories told by the Indians of Washington State
Story told by the Indians of the Lower Columbia River
Stories told by the Eskimo and Greenlanders

§ 17 Stories of a Great Flood in Africa
General absence of flood stories in Africa
Reported traces of such stories
Stories of a Great Flood reported in East Africa

§ 18 The Geographical Diffusion of Flood Stories
Absence of flood stories in a great part of Asia
Rarity of flood stories in Europe
Absence of flood stories in Africa
Presence of flood stories in the Indian Archipelago, New Guinea, Australia, Melanesia, Polynesia, and America
The Hebrew flood story derived from the Babylonian
Most other flood stories apparently independent of the Babylonian
Greek flood stories not borrowed from the Babylonian
Ancient Indian story probably independent of the Babylonian
Wide diffusion of the Algonquin story in North America
Evidence of diffusion in South America and Polynesia

§ The Origin of Stories of a Great Flood
Old theory of a universal deluge supported by evidence of fossils
Survivals of the theory of a universal deluge in the nineteenth century
Stories of a Great Flood interpreted as solar, lunar, or stellar myths
Evidence of geology against a universal deluge
Philosophical theories of a universal primeval ocean
Many flood stories probably reminiscences of real events
Memorable floods in Holland
Floods caused by earthquake waves in the Pacific
Some flood stories in the Pacific probably reminiscences of earthquake waves
Inundations caused by heavy rains
Babylonian story explained by annual inundation of the Euphrates valley
Suess's theory of a flood caused by an earthquake and a typhoon
Objections to the theory
Diluvial traditions partly legendary, partly mythical
Myths of observation based on geological configuration and fossils
All flood stories probably comparatively recent

CHAPTER V: THE TOWER OF BABEL
The Tower of Babel and the confusion of tongues
Later Jewish legends as to the Tower of Babel
The Tower of Babel probably a reminiscence of a temple-tower
Two such ruined temple-towers at Babylon
The mound of Babil, formerly a temple of Marduk
Inscriptions of Nabopolassar and Nebuchadnezzar at Babil
The mound of Birs-Nimrud formerly a temple of Nebo
Inscription of Nebuchadnezzar at Birs-Nimrud
Ruined temple-tower at Ur of the Chaldees
Inscription of Nabonidus at Ur
The temple-tower at Ur perhaps seen by Abraham
Theories as to the primitive language of mankind
Experimental attempts to determine the primitive language
African stories like that of the Tower of Babel
Story told by the Anals of Assam
Story told of the pyramid of Cholula in Mexico
Story told by the Toltecs of Mexico
Karen and Mikir versions of the Tower of Babel
Admiralty Islands' version of the Tower of Babel
Stories as to the origin of the diversity of tongues in Greece, Africa, Assam, Australia, and America

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