Spence. Myths and Legends of Ancient Egypt

Today's free book is Myths and Legends of Ancient Egypt by Lewis Spence with illustrations by Evelyn Paul. For the table of contents, check at the bottom of this post below the image.

The book is available at Project Gutenberg, Internet Archive, and Hathi Trust.

(Osiris beguiled into the Chest)

I. INTRODUCTORY
Local Gods
Animism
Fetishism and Totemism
Creation Myths
The 'Companies' of the Gods
The Egyptian Idea of God
Deities of the Pyramid Texts
Early Burials
The Pyramid
Pyramidal Architecture
'Lost' Pyramids
Mummification
Funeral Offerings
The Ka
The Ba

II. EXPLORATION, HISTORY, AND CUSTOMS 
The Nile Valley
Racial Origin
Egyptian Exploration
Early Researches
Town Planning
Palaces and Mansions
Life and Law in Ancient Egypt
Commerce
Agriculture
Legal Code
Science
The Peasantry
Costume

III. THE PRIESTHOOD: MYSTERIES AND TEMPLES 
The Priesthood
The College of Thebes
Mysteries
The Greek Mysteries
The Egyptian Temple
The Holy Place

IV. THE CULT OF OSIRIS 
Osiris
The Myth of Osiris
Set, the Enemy
The Tamarisk-tree
The Grief of Isis
The Vengeance of Horus
Sir J.G. Frazer on Osiris
Primitive Conceptions of the Moon
Osiris and the Persephone Myth
A New Osirian Theory
Isis
Isis as the Wind
Manifold Attributes of Isis
Horus
The Dream of Thothmes
Heru-Behudeti
The Myth of the Winged Disk
The Slaughter of the Monsters
Other Horus Legends
The Black Hog
Nephthys
Set
Set and the Ass
Anubis
Thoth
Thoth as Soul-Recorder
Maāt
The Book of the Dead
A 'Discovery' 3400 Years Old
The Three Recensions
The Place of Reeds
The Journey of Osiris
The Place of Punishment
The Egyptian Heaven
How the Blessed Lived

V. THE GREAT GODS 
Ra, the Sun-God
Rat
Fusion of Myths
Ra and Osiris
The Sacred Beetle
Amen
Amen's Rise to Power
The Oracle of Jupiter-Ammon
Mut the Mother
The Seker-boat
Sekhmet
The Seven Wise Ones
Bast
The Festival of Bast
Nefer-Tem
I-em-hetep
Khnemu
The Legend of the Nile's Source
Satet
Anqet
Aten
A Religion of One God
A Social Revolt
Aten's Attributes
A Hymn to Aten
Hathor
Hathor as Love-Goddess
The Slaying of Men
The Forms of Hathor
Hapi, the God of the Nile
Counterparts of Hapi
Nut
Taurt
Taurt
Khonsu
The Princess and the Demon
Minor Deities

VI. EGYPTIAN LITERATURE 
Egyptian Language and Writing
The Hieroglyphs
Literature
The Cat and the Jackal
Travellers' Tales
The Story of Saneha
The Fable of the Head and the Stomach
The Rebuking of Amasis
Tales of Magic
The Parting of the Waters
The Prophecy of Dedi
The Visit of the Goddesses
Lyric and Folk Poetry
The True History of Setne and his son Se-Osiris
Se-Osiris
A Vision of Amenti
The Reading of the Sealed Letter
The Contents of the Letter
Magic versus Magic
The War of Enchantments
How Setnau Triumphed over the Assyrians
The Peasant and the Workman
Story of the Two Brothers
The Treachery of Bitou's Wife
The Doomed Prince
The Visit of Ounamounou to the Coasts of Egypt
The Story of Rhampsinites
Civil War in Egypt: The Theft of the Cuirass
The Horrors of War
Succour for Pakrourou
The Shield Regained
The Birth of Hatshepsut
How Thoutii took the Town of Joppa
The Stratagem

VII. MAGIC 
Antiquity of Egyptian Magic
The Wandering Spirit
Coercing the Gods
Names of Power
'Right Speaking'
A Magical Conspiracy
Amulets
Spells
The Gibberish of Magic
The Tale of Setne
A Game of Draughts with the Dead
Medical Magic
Alchemy
Animal Transformation
Dreams
Mummy Magic

VIII. FOREIGN AND ANIMAL GODS: THE LATE PERIOD 
Foreign Deities
Asiatic Gods
Ashtoreth
Semitic and African Influence
Sacred Animals
Apis
The Apis Oracle
The Crocodile
The Lion
The Lion Guardian
The Cat
The Dog
The Hippopotamus
Other Animals
The Ibis
Sacred Trees
The Lotus
Religion of the Late Period
A Religious Reaction
The Worship of Animals
Religion under Persian Rule
The Ptolemaic Period
Fusion of Greek and Egyptian Ideas
The Legend of Sarapis
An Architectural Renaissance
Change in the Conception of the Underworld
Twilight of the Gods

IX. EGYPTIAN ART 
The Materials of Painting
New Empire Art
Egyptian Art Influences
Artistic Remains
Egyptian Colour-harmonies
The Great Simplicity of Egyptian Art


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