Eastwick. The Lights of Canopus

Today's free book is The Anvar-i Suhaili, or The Lights of Canopus translated by Edward B. Eastwick. For the table of contents, check at the bottom of this post below the image.

The book is available at Internet ArchiveHathi Trust, and Google Books.


Story 1.—The Story of the Two Pigeons, Bazindah and Nawazindah: in illustration of the Dangers of Traveling

Story 2.—The Story of the Hawking Falcon: in illustration of the Advantages of Traveling

Story 3.—The Story of the Greedy Cat: in illustration of the Desirableness of Contentment with one's lot

Story 4.—The Story of the Swordsman who sought Kingship and Rule: in illustration of the Necessity of Courage in securing a Position in Life

Story 5.—The Story of the Tiger who entertained a Desire to Rule: in illustration of the Necessity for Diligent Exertion in our Enterprises

CHAPTER I.—On Avoiding the Talk of Slanderers and Calumniators

Story 1.—The Story of the Dying Merchant who assembled his Three Sons: in illustration of the Necessity of Industry and of the Abandonment of Sloth

Story 2.—The Story of the Two Princes: inculcating a Reliance upon Providence

Story 3.—The Story of the Dervish who neglected Causation: in illustration of a Commendable Reliance on God, without the neglect of Secondary Causes

Story 4.—The Story of the Wasteful Rat: in Condemnation of Lavish Expenditure

Story 5.—The Story of the Ape and the Wedge: in illustration of the Evil Effects of Meddling with what we do not understand

Story 6.—The Story of the Two Companions, Salim and Ghanim, contrasting Perseverance with Indolence and Self-indulgence

Story 7.—The Story of a Fox who was deceived by the size of a thing: in illustration of the Evil of Judging by External Appearances

Story 8.—The Story of the Devotee who had his Robe of Honor Stolen: to shew that our Misfortunes are Caused by our own Culpable Conduct

Story 9.—The Story of the Weak Sparrow, who obtained his Revenge on the Falcon: in illustration of the Advantage of Perseverance in Repelling an Enemy

Story 10.—The Story of the Just King: showing that 'Whoever does what he ought not, suffers what he would not'

Story 11.—The Story of the Raven and the Serpent: illustrating the Superiority of Skill over Violence

Story 12.—The Story of the Heron and the Crab: showing that those who Contrive Evil to others often Circumvent Themselves

Story 13.—The Story of the Hare and the Fox: illustrating the Futility of employing Artifice towards the Cautious and Cunning

Story 14.—The Story of the Hare and the Lion: showing that by Artifice the Weak may overcome the Powerful

Story 15.—The Story of the Three Fishes—'Very Cautious,' 'Cautious,' and 'Helpless'— inculcating the Value of Wisdom and Caution

Story 16.—The Story of the Scorpion and the Tortoise: showing that the Natural Disposition will always make itself Apparent

Story 17.—The Story of the Goose, who mistook the Moon for a Fish, and, discovering its Error, abandoned the Pursuit of Fish

Story 18.—The Story of the Hunting Falcon and the Domestic Fowl: showing that those who seek the Society of Princes do so in Ignorance of its Dangers

Story 19.—The Story of the Nightingale and the Rose: adduced to show the Folly of Contending with the Divine Decree

Story 20.—The Story of the Hunter: illustrating the Evils of Excessive Covetousness and Greed

Story 21.—The Story of the Crow, the Wolf, and the Jackal: showing that when the Crafty confederate they can overthrow the Innocent

Story 22.—The Story of the Sandpiper and the Genius of the Sea: illustrating the Evil Effects of Contemning even Weak Enemies

Story 23.—The Story of the Tortoise carried by the Geese: illustrating the Evil Results of not attending to the Advice of Well-Wishing Friends

Story 24.—The Story of the Monkeys and the Bird: showing the Evil Consequences of giving Advice to those Disinclined to Listen

Story 25.—The Story of the Two Partners, Sharp-wit and Light-heart: illustrating the Superiority of Uprightness and Honest Simplicity

Story 26.—The Story of the Frog whose Young Ones were devoured by a Snake: showing that Deceit recoils upon those who employ it

Story 27.—The Story of the Solitary Gardener who formed a friendship with a Bear: illustrating the Evils of Incongruous Friendship

Story 28.—The Story of the Clever Merchant: who, by his Wit and Readiness, obtained the Restitution of Goods of which he had been Plundered

CHAPTER II.—On the Punishment of Evil-doers; and their Disastrous End

Story 1.—The Story of the Fox: showing that the Pursuit of Impossibilities leads to Ruin

Story 2.—The Story of the Ass who sought to recover his lost Tail, but who lost his Ears also: in further illustration of the above

Story 3.—The Story of the king's Equerry: in illustration of the Evil result of Disclosing Secrets

Story 4.—The Story of the Devotee: showing the Value of Retirement and Freedom from Care; and the Disadvantage of giving them up

Story 5. The Story of the Blind Man who Mistook a Snake for a Whip: illustrating the Folly of being Fascinated by Outward Appearance

Story 6.—The Story of the Saint of Radiant Mind: showing that Holy Men may Effect essential Good by Frequenting Courts

Story 7.—The Story of the Merchant's Wife and the Slave: showing the Evil of Acting Precipitately

Story 8.—The Story of the Three Envious Persons: illustrating the Baleful Effects of Envy

Story 9.—The Story of the Ignorant Physician: showing the Disastrous Results of acting in Ignorance and on mere Conjecture

Story 10.—The Story of the Falconer who falsely accused his Lord's Wife: showing the Punishment which attends Lying Testimony

CHAPTER III.—On the Agreement of Friends, and the Advantage of their Mutually Aiding one another

Story 1.—The Story of the Pigeons: illustrating the Advantage of the United Action of friends

Story 2.—The Story of the Hawk and the Partridge: showing the Evil results of an Injudicious Choice of Companions

Story 3.—The Story of the Camel-rider and the Snake: showing the Necessity of Caution in Relying upon the Promises of an Enemy

Story 4.—The Story of the Wife of the Host: showing that one should Suspect the Motives of Persons who seem willing to Forego an Advantage

Story 5.—The Story of the Wolf and the Bow-string: the moral of which is that Greediness in amassing results in Disaster

Story 6.—The Story of the Greedy Cat: showing that he that is not Content with a Sufficiency will suffer for it

CHAPTER IV.—In Explanation of Attentively regarding the Circumstances of our Enemies

Story 1.—The Story of the Owl-king, Shabhhang, and the Crow-king, Piruz: inculcating the Value of Circumspection

Story 2.—The Story of the King, of Kashmir: showing the Danger of Revealing one's Secret Designs

Story 3—The Story of the Birds who assembled to make a Chief; and of the origin of the Enmity and Hostility of the Owls and the Crows

Story 4.—The Story of the Clever Hare: in illustration of the Advantage of Securing a Skillful Leader

Story 5.—The Story of the Hypocritical Cat who Devoured the Partridge and the Quail: showing that Confidence is not to be placed in the Crafty

Story 6.—The Story (Metrical) of the Judge: showing that Integrity is all that is required in a Judge

Story 7.—The Story of the Thieves, who persuaded the Devotee that his Sheep was a Dog: showing that 'Stratagem is Better than Force'

Story 8.—The Story of the Merchant's Wife: showing that some emergencies reconcile a Man to his Enemy

Story 9.—The Story of the Thief and the Demon: illustrating the proverb, 'That when Rogues fall out, Honest Men come by their own'

Story 10.—The Story of the Carpenter, who was Deceived by the Specious Words of his Profligate Wife

Story 11.—The Story of the patriotic Monkey: showing that some will surrender even Life for their Friends and Country

Story 12.—The Story of the Mouse; an Example of the Strength of Natural Habits and Predilections

Story 13.—The Story of the Snake and the Frog: showing that a Resolute Man will submit even to Indignities to Preserve his Friends

Story 14.—The Story of the Sparrow and the Snake: in illustration of the Danger of Despising an Enemy

CHAPTER V.—On the Detriment of Giving way to Negligence, and of Permitting the Objects of Desire to Escape

Story 1.—The Story of the Monkey-king, Kardan and the Tortoise: an example of the Folly of Undervaluing and Letting Slip our Blessings

Story 2.—The Story of the King of Kashmir and his Monkey-sentinel:  illustrating the truth of the Proverb, 'Save me from my Friends'

Story 3.—The Story of the Ass and the Fox: showing that he who suffers himself to be Twice Deceived by the same Person is an Absolute Fool

CHAPTER VI.—On the Calamitous Results of Precipitation, and the Injuriousness of Haste

Story 1.—The Story of the Holy Man, who, through Precipitation, stained his hands with the Innocent Blood of an Ichneumon

Story 2.—The Story of the Devotee who Spilt the Jar of Honey and Oil: 'Do not count your Chickens before they are hatched'

Story 3.—The Story of the King who killed the Hawk that had just Saved his Life: showing the Evils of Precipitate Action

CHAPTER VII.—Of Vigilance and Deliberation, and of Escaping from the Injuries of Foes

Story 1.—The Story of the Rat and the Cat: to impress upon one the Necessity of Foresight and Reflection, in order to avoid Evils

Story 2.—-The Story of the Farmer's Wife: showing the Evil Results which certainly overtake those who do not Fulfill their Troth and Plight

Story 3.—The Story of the Mouse and the Frog: illustrating the Evils of an Injudicious Friendship

CHAPTER VIII.—On Avoiding the Malevolent, and not Relying on their Professions of Attachment

Story 1.—The Story of Ibn-i Madin and the Lark: showing the Necessity for Caution in Dealing with one who has become a Malignant Enemy

Story 2.—The Story of Danadil and the Thieves: showing the Certain Effects of Retributive Justice

Story 3.—The Story of the Old Woman and her Daughter Muhasti: illustrating the Inherent Love of Life in mankind

Story 4.—The Story of the Musician and the King: shewing that Events Beyond our Control will be sure to Wrest from us Many Enjoyments

Story 5.—The Story of the Physician and the Ignorant Patient: shewing that Mental Acuteness will often be the best Cure for Bodily Ills

Story 6.—The Story of the King of Turkistan: shewing that the Weak ought to Shun Encounters with the Powerful

Story 7.—The Story of the Devotee and the Wolf: showing the Uselessness of Giving Advice which is not Heeded

Story 8.—The Story of the Hungry Arab, who made a Bargain with the Baker

CHAPTER IX.—Of the Excellence of Clemency: that it is the rest Attribute of Kings, and the most Pleasing Quality of the Mighty

Story 1.—The Story of the Lion, Kamjui, and the Jackal, Farisah: inculcating the Necessity that exists for Monarchs to Reward Well-doers

Story 2.—The Story of the Flies who Settled in the Vessel of Honey: in illustration of the Advantage of Withdrawing from Worldly Pursuits

Story 3.—The Story of the Sultan of Baghdad: inculcating in Monarchs the duty of Sacrificing Private Gratification to the Public Good

Story 4.—The Story of the Wretched Merchant, who ordered his slave to kill him, showing the Strength of the Passion of Envy

Story 5.—The Story of the King of Yaman and his Chamberlain: showing the Gracefulness of Clemency in Kings

CHAPTER X.—On the Subject of Requiting Actions by Way of Retribution

Story 1.—The Story of the rank-breaking Lion and the Archer: illustrating the uses of a Belief in Retributive Justice

Story 2.—The Story of the Seller of Wood and the Tyrant who Oppressed him, and whose Property was Destroyed in Retribution for his Tyranny

Story 3.—The Story of the Hog and the Monkey that Devoured his Fruit, and, in Retribution for this, was Destroyed

CHAPTER XI—Ox the Detriment of Seeking More, and Failing in One's Object:

Story 1.—The Story of the Versatile Guest who Wished to Learn the Hebrew Tongue; showing the Folly of Quitting one's Profession

Story 2.—The Story of the Crane; illustrating the Evil of Following Uncongenial Pursuits

Story 3.—The Story of the Man and his Two Wives: shewing the Advantage of Adhering to One Line of Conduct

Story 4.—The Story of the Hunter: showing that no Loss Accrues from Toil after Learning

Story 5.—The Story of the Crow that Tried to Learn the Gait of the Mountain-Partridge, and so Forgot his Own

CHAPTER XII.—Or the Excellency of Mildness and Calmness and Tranquillity and Composure, Especially in Kinds

Story I.—The Story of the King of Hindustan; showing the Advantage which Accrues to Kings from having Sage Ministers

Story 2.—The Story of Sulaiman and the Heron: adduced to show the Worthlessness of Life without Suitable Companions

Story 3.—The Story of the Letter-Possessing King: illustrating the Evils of Precipitation and Rashness

Story 4.—The Story of the Pigeon: in further illustration of the above

CHAPTER XIII.—On the Shunning of the Perfidious and Traitorous by Kings

Story 1.—The Story of the Goldsmith and the Traveler: in illustration of the Proverb that 'Evil Communications Corrupt Good Manners'

Story 2.—The Story of the Prince and the Shoemaker: in further illustration of the above

CHAPTER XIV.—On Abstaining from Regard to the Vicissitudes of Time, and the Basing One's Actions on the Will of God

Story 1.-—The Story of the King and his Two Sons: in illustration of the Necessity of Relying on the Decrees of Providence

Story 2.—The Story of the Farmer and the Purse of Gold: in further illustration of the above

Story 3.—-The Story of the Old Man and the Two Hoopoes: in further Illustration of the above

Conclusion of the Book

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